UK government backing personalized medicine global partnerships

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Conference in the UK On Genomics and Global Health

London was a hub of activity recently, as more than 30 representatives from 15 different countries got together to share ideas and talk with experts based in the UK about genomic collaborations. The conference was called: “The impact of the genomics revolution on global health – how can governments respond?” Hot topics up for discussion included personalized medicine and generic drugs. The UK is a global front-runner in genomics, in charge of the ‘100,000 Genomes Project’. This means it will categorize the genomes of NHS service users with NHS data. It is at a radical phase of an in-depth lasting strategy for assimilating genomic and custom-made medicine into the day-to-day distribution of healthcare.

The conference ran over two days, giving the diverse range of delegate’s ample opportunity to learn from each other, share knowledge and attend a range of seminars on this exciting topic. Personalized medicine is gaining real traction across the globe, as medical professionals focus on individually treating their patients. The UK government support of the initiatives made London the perfect place for the conference as well. Representatives from the generic pharmaceutical industry were in attendance at the conference and able to use the opportunity to share their breakthrough technology with the delegates.

The visit was a chance to reveal the UK’s knowledge, talk about the challenges of making a genomics service and work on international partnerships.

Delegates took part in: a tour of study facilities so delegates could see for themselves how the UK is using breakthrough technology to introduce genomics into clinical practice.

Professor Rory Shaw, of Healthcare UK spoke about the positive impact of working with UK genomics experts, saying that the UK presented a truly strong body of expertise in this area, which should mean that other counties around the globe could benefit from the knowledge sharing connections that can be made with the UK. Professor Shaw went on to highlight the need for collaborative work in enhancing the global understanding of the benefits of personalized medicine and genomics.

 

 

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